Federal Government Designations

Federal Government

Small Disadvantaged Business Development Program:


CBM is enrolled in the SBA’s Small Disadvantaged business development program The SBA administers two particular business assistance programs for small disadvantaged businesses (SDBs). These programs are the 8(a) Business Development Program and the Small Disadvantaged Business Certification Program. While the 8(a) Program offers a broad scope of assistance to socially and economically disadvantaged firms, SDB certification strictly pertains to benefits in federal procurement. 8(a) firms automatically qualify for SDB certification.

For additionalo information on this program please go to:
SBA SDB Program Info

To research the program, as it pertains to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), go to: FAR Part 19.12 - Small Disadvantaged Business Participation

 

Veteran Owned

CBM is owned and controlled by a Military Veteran. This combined with its Small business status, as determined by the SBA, qualifies it as a Small Veteran Owned Business Concern. To learn more about this designation or the Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business Concern go to:
Veteran Owned Business Information

To research the program, as it pertains to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), go to: FAR Part 19.14 - Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business

 

Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business:


CBM is a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business Concern. On October 20, 2004, President George W. Bush issued Executive Order (E.O.) 13360 to provide and strengthen prime and subcontracting opportunities in Federal contracting for service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSB) in Federal contracting and subcontracting. Each Federal Government Agency Head must develop a strategy to implement the E.O.’s policy and designate a senior-level agency official to develop and execute the strategy. The Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs has been designated by the Secretary as the official responsible for implementation of E.O. 13360. The development and implementation of this plan shall be included as a significant element in the performance plans of the Deputy Secretary, Assistant Secretary for Management, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Materiel Management, and the Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.

To research the program, as it pertains to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), go to: FAR Part 19.14 - Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business

 

8(a) Business Development Program:


CBM is enrolled in the SBA’s 8(a) business development program. The SBA administers two particular business assistance programs for small disadvantaged businesses (SDBs). These programs are the 8(a) Business Development Program and the Small Disadvantaged Business Certification Program. While the 8(a) Program offers a broad scope of assistance to socially and economically disadvantaged firms, SBD certification strictly pertains to benefits in Federal Procurement. Companies which are 8(a) firms automatically qualify for SDB certification.

Participants can receive sole-source contracts, up to a ceiling of $3.5 million for goods and services and $5.5 million for manufacturing. While SBA helps 8(a) firms build their competitive and institutional know-how, the agency also encourages them to participate in competitive acquisitions.

Federal acquisition policies encourage Federal agencies to award a certain percentage of their contracts to SDBs. To speed up the award process, the SBA has signed Partnership Agreements (PAs) with a number of federal agencies allowing them to contract directly with certified 8(a) firms.

8(a) firms are permitted to form joint ventures and teams to bid on contracts. This enhances the ability of 8(a) firms to perform larger prime contracts and overcome the effects of contract bundling, the combining of two or more contracts together into one large contract.

Program goals require 8(a) firms to maintain a balance between their commercial and government business. There is also a limit on the total dollar value of sole-source contracts that an individual participant can receive while in the program: $100 million or five times the value of its primary NAICS code. The overall program goal is to graduate firms that will go on to thrive in a competitive business environment.

To achieve this end, SBA district offices monitor and measure the progress of participants through annual reviews, business planning, and systematic evaluations. 8(a) participants may take advantage of specialized business training, counseling, marketing assistance, and high-level executive development provided by the SBA and its resource partners. They may also be eligible for assistance in obtaining access to surplus government property and supplies, SBA-guaranteed loans, and bonding assistance

For additionalo information on this program please go to:
SBA 8(a) Program Info

To research the program, as it pertains to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), go to: FAR Part 19 - Small Business Programs